Individuals Detained in Mainland China for Supporting Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests

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Individuals Detained in Mainland China for Supporting Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests

Updated September 23, 2016

Many Chinese citizens have faced reprisals for supporting the Hong Kong protests for universal suffrage that began in September 2014, with police detaining such individuals in the mainland starting that October. Many mainlanders have expressed their support by going to Hong Kong to join the protests, or meeting in small gatherings and posting messages on social media, including photos of themselves holding signs in support of the protests and demanding constitutional democracy for the territory. The occupation of several areas of Hong Kong, including parts of its financial and political center, inspired many Chinese on the mainland to even speak up for democracy in China.

To date, CHRD has documented 118 cases of detained individuals, of whom 8 are still in custody. Ten have faced trial, of whom seven have been convicted and given prison sentences; three are awaiting a verdict. Two have been released at the end of their sentence Twenty-six total were formally arrested, 32 were criminally detained, and five more put under administrative detention. Police have harassed and intimidated countless others by visiting their homes and issuing warnings, or putting them under house arrest. Several have gone into hiding. Individuals are known to have been seized in the municipalities of Beijing (where the majority of cases have been reported), Chongqing, and Shanghai, and the provinces of Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Hunan, Jiangxi, Liaoning, and Shandong.

Violations of Chinese laws

The manner in which dozens of the individuals who have been detained violates China’s Criminal Procedure Law (CPL), particularly in terms of providing information of detention place and legal status of detention. The CPL stipulates that police must present a detention warrant when taking an individual into custody and also notify the family within 24 hours, unless they are suspected of certain crimes that fall under the category of “endangering state security” or terrorism, or they are incapable of informing the family (Article 83). Many of the families of these detainees’ have not received a notice from police, and instead activists have gone to detention centers and confirmed the vast majority of these cases. Police have also threatened many of the families in Beijing after they inquired about their loved ones or tried to hire lawyers.

The majority of the detainees below have been been charged with “picking quarrels and provoking troubles,” a less serious crime than those related to state security, and which is now frequently used to punish outspoken rights advocates. However, in the majority of recorded cases that have moved to indictment or trial stage, the charge has changed to the “political” crime “inciting subversion of state power,” which carries a potentially longer criminal sentence.

What should actually happen when a person is detained—as opposed to what often occurs during crackdowns or other politically motivated detentions in China?

According to the CPL, police have 24 hours to interrogate a person in custody. If no evidence of criminal activity is found, the individual must be released (Article 84). Eleven individuals on this list were held for under 24 hours and then released. If an individual is not released, police must place them either under criminal detention—charged with a criminal offenses as stipulated in China’s Criminal Law—or administrative detention, charged under the Public Security Administration Punishment Law. A suspect who has been criminally detained can be held for up to a maximum 37 days before they must be either released or formally arrested (Article 89). Administrative detentions can last for up to 15 days, though many individuals under this form of detention in recent crackdowns were held for longer, or were placed in criminal detention after (or even during) their period of administrative punishment. In this crackdown so far, as in previous ones, police have placed various obstacles to block lawyers from visiting their clients (violating Chapter 4 on Defense and Representation of the CPL, among other laws). If cases from 2014 are any guide, police may even detain the lawyers themselves for demanding that their clients receive legal protections and the right to counsel.

CHRD urges the Chinese government to respect its own laws and international human rights standards, and immediately release the detained individuals, who have not committed any crime by exercising their rights to freedom of expression and assembly.

List of mainland Chinese supporters detained for supporting Hong Kong protests

The list is organized by those still in custody by form of detention, followed by a list of those detained and then released by location in alphabetical order, starting with municipalities and followed by provinces:

 

Still in custody:

Sentenced:

  • Mr. Wang Mo (王默), activist, sentenced to 4.5 years in prison for “inciting subversion of state power” on April 8, 2016. Initially tried on November 19, 2015 by Guangzhou Municipal Intermediate People’s Court. First taken into custody on October 3, 2014, for “picking quarrels and provoking troubles” after holding up a banner in a Guangzhou park calling for freedom and support for the Hong Kong protestors with Xie Wenfei (below) and Sun Liyong. Later formally arrested on the more serious “inciting subversion” charge on November 17, 2014. Now held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center.
  • Mr. Xie Wenfei (谢文飞 real name Xie Fengxia 谢丰夏), activist, sentenced to 4.5 years in prison for “inciting subversion of state power” on April 8, 2016. Initially tried on November 19, 2015 by Guangzhou Municipal Intermediate People’s Court.First taken into custody on October 3, 2014 for “picking quarrels and provoking troubles” after holding up a banner in a Guangzhou park calling for freedom and support for the Hong Kong protestors with Wang Mo (above) and Sun Liyong. Xie was tortured and mistreated while in the detention center. According to his lawyer, Wu Kuiming (吴魁明), at one point during Xie’s detention, his arms and legs were shackled and fastened together for a total of over 100 hours, during which Xie was given only periodic access to water or the bathroom. Now held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center.
  • Mphoto_2014-10-03_11-55-21r. Zhang Shengyu (张圣雨 real name Zhang Rongping 张荣平), activist, sentenced to four years for “inciting subversion of state power” on April 8, 2016. Arrested on February 5, 2015, and tried on November 23 that year by the Guangzhou Municipal Intermediate People’s Court. Plainclothes police first seized him on October 3 while Zhang was walking down a street in Guangzhou, and then criminally detained him for “picking quarrels and provoking troubles.” After being held incommunicado for months, Zhang’s lawyer Liu Zhengqing (刘正清) met Zhang on January 7, 2015. In September 2015, Zhang reportedly complained about being disciplined, and in retaliation was shackled and beaten, including being kicked in the head, and was restricted from using the toilet, washing his teeth, washing, or changing his clothes. Zhang was taken into custody days after he posted a photo of himself holding a sign backing Hong Kong and Beijing activist Han Ying, who was also arrested in the crackdown. Held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center.
  • Mr. Pei Guodong (裴国动) of Hebei Province was sentenced on April 1, 2016 to 4.5 years in prison for “picking quarrels and provoking trouble” by Weichang Manchu and Mongol Autonomous County People’s Court in Chengde City. Tried on March 17, 2016. He was criminally detained on November 14, 2015, on suspicion of “picking quarrels and provoking troubles” and indicted on December 10. Police seized him for supporting the Hong Kong Occupy Central protests that took place in October 2014. Prosecutors allege that he provided an overseas website with photographs of mainland activists holding a banner with a message of support for the movement in Hong Kong. Pei has been on a hunger strike to protest his detention ever since being taken into custody. According to his lawyer, Li Weida (李威达), Pei has been force-fed in a hospital and grown so weak that he can only get around with a wheelchair, and he also suffers from high blood pressure, heart disease, and diabetes. Pre-trial proceedings on his case took place on January 26, 2016. Lawyer Li called for the court to throw out illegal evidence against Pei and allow him to be released on bail due to his physical state, but neither request was granted.
  • Mr. Xia Lin (夏霖), the lawyer for Guo Yushan, was sentenced to 12 years in prison for “fraud” on September 22, 2016 following a June 17 trial. Criminally detained on November 8, 2014, he was arrested on January 3, 2015. Xia is a colleague of Pu Zhiqiang at the Huayi Law Firm in Beijing. According to his lawyer, Xia said the majority of police interrogations focused on his past handling of “politically-sensitive” cases, questions about Occupy Hong Kong, and his relationship with individuals such as Guo Yushan, Pu Zhiqiang, and Ai Weiwei, amongst others, and not the alleged fraud. Held at Beijing No. 3 Detention Center.

Tried:

  • Mr. Sun Feng (孙峰), activist from Zibo City, Shangdong, tried on June 10, 2015, by the Zibo City Intermediate People’s Court. First arrested on November 28 on a charge of “inciting subversion of state power” after being criminally detained on November 17. According to his lawyer, Sun has been physically injured by being force-fed after conducting short-term hunger strikes in detention. He is held at Zibo City Detention Center.
  •  Ms. Su Changlan (苏昌兰), activist, tried on April 21, 2016 by Foshan Intermediate People’s Court on charges of  “inciting subversion of state power.” Originally Su was criminally summoned for the third time on October 27, 2014, on suspicion of “picking quarrels and provoking troubles” and had her home searched and three laptops seized. The next day she was criminally detained on the more serious “inciting subversion” charge and then indicted in November 2015. Active leader in Guangdong pro-Hong Kong activities. Held at Nanhai District Detention Center.
  • Mr. Chen Qitang (陈启棠, aka Tian Li 天理), activist and online political commentator, tried on April 22, 2016 by Foshan Intermediate People’s Court on charges of “inciting subversion of state power.” First seized in the afternoon of October 14, 2014,  and given a 10-day administrative detention. Police searched his home, seizing a laptop computer. Held in Xiantang Town in the Shunde District of Foshan until release on October 25. Police took Chen into custody again due to his association with fellow Foshan activist Su Changlan (苏昌兰), and arrested him on December 31, 2014, on a charge of “inciting subversion of state power.” Chen was indicted on December 8, 2015. Held at Nanhai District Detention Center.

Released at end of prison sentence:

  • QQ图片20141212230854Mr. Ye Xiaozheng (叶晓峥 also know by screen name “Humian Yidan” 湖面一丹), activist, was sentenced to 18 months imprisonment on December 29, 2015 on charges of “picking quarrels and provoking troubles” by Huicheng District People’s Court in Huizhou City, Guangdong. Tried on July 23, 2015. Formally charged on June 18, 2015. Authorities accused him of spreading “false” information online, and inciting a September 2014 strike by trash collectors in Boluo County, Huizhou. Intitially criminally detained on December 12, 2014, and then arrested on January 17, 2015. Lawyer Sui Muqing (随牧青) met him on December 18, 2014, when he learned that Ye had been harshly interrogated for long periods while shackled. Held at Huizhou City Detention Center until he was released on June 11, 2016 at the end of his sentence.
  • Internet writer Liang Qinhui (梁勤辉), who uses the screen name “Sharp Knife” (尖刀), was sentenced to 18 months in prison for “inciting subversion of state power” on April 8, 2016. Initially tried on November 13, 2015 by the Guangzhou Municipal Intermediate People’s Court. Liang had expressed support online for the Hong Kong protests, and he made comments on QQ (a Facebook-like social media platform) that allegedly “discredited” Xi Jinping and China’s one-party rule. Police initially criminally detained him on February 5, 2015 on suspicion of “inciting subversion” and held him at Haizhu District Detention Center in Guangzhou before formally arresting him on March 9. He was later indicted around May. Held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center until his release on August 3, 2016 at the end of his prison sentence.

Those detained and later released on bail are listed below by location:

Beijing Municipality:

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A group of 20 housing rights and human rights activists met at a restaurant on September 29, when they took photos holding up a sign that read “Beijing Families of Forced Eviction Support Hong Kong” (pictured above), which were then posted online. Thirteen were criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.”  Eight were later released on “bail pending further investigation,” while five were formally arrested.  All had been held at the Fengtai District Detention Center before their release.

Arrested and released on bail

  • Ms. Han Ying (韩颖), housing and child rights activist, 2011 independent candidate for Beijing National People’s Congress elections, founder of an NGO, siezed on October 1, formally arrested on November 6. Released on “bail pending further investigation” on May 30, 2015.
  • Mr. Jiang Liuyong (姜流勇), housing rights activist (husband of Li Dongmei), siezed on September 30, formally arrested on November 6. Released on “bail pending further investigation” on May 30, 2015.
  • Ms. Li Dongmei (李冬梅), housing and women’s rights activist (wife of Jiang Liuying), siezed on September 30, formally arrested on November 6. Released on “bail pending further investigation” on May 30, 2015.
  • Ms. Liu Huizhen (刘惠珍), housing rights activist, siezed on October 1, formally arrested on November 6. Released on “bail pending further investigation” on May 30, 2015.
  • Mr. Xu Chongyang (徐崇阳), activist, seized on October 2, formally arrested on November 6. Xu reported to his lawyer that he has been subjected to torture to force him to confess. During his first month of detention, police subjected him to daily interrogations lasting as long as 20 hours. They also beat Xu in the detention center corridors and bathrooms, slapped him in the face, and kicked him in the genitalia. Released on “bail pending further investigation” on May 30, 2015.

Released on bail

  • Mr. Chen Lianhe (陈连和), housing rights activist, seized on September 30 and released on bail on November 1. Sent to a “legal education” center in Hebei upon release.
  • Ms. Cui Baodi (崔宝弟), housing rights activist, seized on September 30 and released on bail on November 1. Sent to a “legal education” center in Hebei upon release.
  • Ms. Wu Xiaoping (吴小平), housing rights activist, seized on September 30 and released on bail on November 1. Sent to a “legal education” center in Hebei upon release.
  • Ms. Han Shuqing (韩淑清), housing rights activist, seized on September 30 and released on bail on November 1. Returned home.
  • Ms. Guo Zhiying (郭志英), housing rights activist, seized on September 30 and released on bail on November 1.
  • Mr. Zhang Zonggang (张宗钢), housing rights activist, seized on October 1 and released on bail on November 1.
  • Mr. Wang Chongxi (王崇喜), activist, seized on October 2, and later released on “bail pending further investigation.”
  • Ms. Zhang Huiyin (张会银), seized on October 9, and later released on “bail pending further investigation.”

 

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A number of individuals who attended a dinner on September 30 to celebrate the release from prison of Mr. Yuan Dong (袁冬), a New Citizens’ Movement participant, were later detained. Some relatives or associates of the dinner attendees were briefly taken into custody and then released. At least 60 people gathered at a restaurant in Daxing District, with some holding signs supporting the protests in Hong Kong (pictured above). All who were seized were held on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.”

Arrested and released on bail

  • 姜家文Mr. Jiang Jiawen (姜家文), petitioner from Liaoning Province, was arrested in December on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Jiang was criminally detained on October 2, a day after being seized. Held in Fengtai District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on May 30, 2015.

 

 

  • Ms. Li Yufeng (李玉), petitioner activist from Hunan Province, formaly arrested on November 6 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” She was seized on September 30 and on October 9 activists confirmed Li had been criminally detained. Held at Daxing District Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on June 5, 2015.
  •  Mr. Wang Yonghong (王永红), activist, criminally detained late in the night of October 11, and later formally arrested on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on an unknown date. Held in the Daxing District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on June 5, 2015.

Released

  • Ms. Xiao Yunling (肖蕴苓), Guo’s 77-year mother, seized at the same time as Guo and held for over 12 hours before she was released.
  • Mr. Sheng Lanfu (盛兰福), detained on an unknown date. Held at Daxing District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on October 31.
  • Mr. Guo Hongwei (郭洪伟), petitioner-activist originally from Jilin Province, taken into custody on September 30. Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 1.
  • Mr. Wu Jixin (吴继新), activist from Jiangsu Province, criminally detained on October 1. Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 1.
  • 侯敏玲Ms. Hou Minling (侯敏玲), petitioner from Gansu Province, seized on October 3 and criminally detained the next day. Held at Daxing District Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” in the first week of November. Moved to a black jail in the Xinlu Guesthouse in Daxing District before forcibly returned to her home town in Hui County, Longnan City by local authorities on November 11.

 

  • Ms. Wang Su’e (王素娥), petitioner activist, seized on October 3 after she left a Christian home church service. Held at the Daxing District Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 9.
  • Ms. Zhu Yachun (朱雅春), detained on October 11. Held at Daxing District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 18.
  • Mr. Xu Nailai (许乃来), detained in the evening of October 12 with his 8-year old daughter Xu Yanzhi (see below). Held at Daxing District Detention Center. Went on a hunger strike over the disappearance of his daughter, and transferred to Beijing No. 731 Hospital on November 17. Released into a form of Tianjin police control with his daughter on December 30.
  • Ms. Xu Yanzhi (许严之), 8-year old daughter of Xu Nailai (see above), missing since October 12 after being forcibly seized by police with her father. Held for several hours in police custody, and then taken to Chaoyang District Minor Relief Center in Wang Siying Road. Released into a form of police control with her father on December 30.
  • Mr. Wei Zhengxiang (魏正祥), petitioner from Guizhou, criminally detained on October 10 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until his release on bail on an unknown date.
  • Ms. Xu Meiying (许梅英), detained on an unknown date. Held at unknown location and believed to have been released.

 

Lawyers of detainees have also been targeted.

  • imageMr. Yu Wensheng (余文生), lawyer, formally arrested on November 20 after he was taken into custody on October 13 from the offices of the Dao Heng Law Firm. Held at Daxing District Detention Center until release on bail on January 20. Reportedly in poor health.

 

 

  • Mr. Wang Cheng (王成), lawyer, taken into custody on October 13 from the offices of the Dao Heng Law Firm. Released the next day.
  • Mr. Li Duilong (李对龙), lawyer, taken into custody on October 13 from the offices of the Dao Heng Law Firm. Released the next day.
  • 宋泽Mr. Song Ze (宋泽, aka Song Guangqiang 宋光强) activist, formally arrested. Taken into custody on October 13 from the offices of the Dao Heng Law Firm. Held at Daxing District Detention Center, where he was allgedly tortured, until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on June 5, 2015.

 

 

 

Starting on October 1, police in Beijing’s Songzhuang art colony have been detaining artists for expressing support for the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.

Arrested and released on bail

  • ByyARpwCQAAlsPP.jpg_largeMr. Wang Zang (王藏), artist and poet originally from Yunnan Province, formally arrested on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Released on bail on July 9, 2015. Initially detained on October 1, after which his home was searched. Wang’s met with his lawyer Sui Muqing (隋牧青) for the first time on December 25, when Sui learnt that Wang had been tortured in prison; guards beat Wang, interrogated him continously for five days and four nights, and put him under so much stress that he suffered a heart attack, despite having no previous heart problems. Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center.
  • Ms. Zhang Miao (张淼), news assistant with German magazine Die Zeit, formally arrested on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Released on bail on July 9, 2015. Initially detained on October 2. Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center.
  • Mr. Zhui Hun (追魂 aka Liu Jinxing 刘进兴), artist, formally arrested on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Released on bail on July 9, 2015. Initially taken into police custody on October 8. Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center, and formally arrested.
  • Mr. Zhu Yanguang (朱雁光), artist, formally arrested. Released on bail on July 9, 2015. First taken into custody on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on October 2. First held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center and then later moved to Tongzhou District Detention Center.

Released on bail

  •  Mr. Liu Qiming (刘骐鸣), artist, detained on October 22 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at an unknown location until release on October 22.
  • indexMs. Wang Lin (王琳), art director originally from Hubei Province, disappeared on October 2 and was held incommunicado until October 7, when she was confirmed to be detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Police took her into custody after she attended a poetry event on October 2 held in support of the Hong Kong movement. Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on October 30.

 

  • Mr. Fei Xiaosheng (费晓胜), artist, taken into custody on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on October 2. Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 9.
  • Mr. Cui Guangxia (崔广厦), artist, taken into custody on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on October 2. Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 9.
  • Mr. Lü Shang (吕上), artist, taken into police custody on October 8 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 9.
  • Mr. Zhang Haiying (张海鹰), artist, taken into custody on October 11 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 9.
  • Mr. Ouyang Xiaorong (欧阳晓戎), writer focusing on freedom and poet, taken into custody with Kuang Laowu on October 11 and released the next day.
  • Mr. Ren Zhongyuan (任重远), artist, taken into custody on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on October 2. Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation.”
  • Mr. Ding Ding (丁酊, aka Ding Weibing 丁伟兵), artist, taken into custody on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” in the early morning of October 6. Police searched his residence and confiscated a computer, a hard drive from a notebook computer, and a camera memory card. Held in Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation.”
  • Ms. Chen Cheng (陈酲), artist, taken into police custody on October 10 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation.”
  • 邝老五Mr. Kuang Laowu (邝老五), Tibetan artist, taken into custody on October 11 and police searched his home the same day. Held on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” at Tongzhou District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation.”

 

 

  • Mr. Cheng Guang (程广), artist, detained on October 21 on unknown charges. Held at Tongzhou District Detention Center until release on bail.
  • Mr. Li Lei (李磊), artist, taken into police custody on October 8 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Centeuntil release on bail.

Images of Songzhuang artists supporting Hong Kong, many of whom were detained as a result and are on this list:

A group photo of Songzhuang artists after an art performance. The small sign has messages in support of Hong Kong.

Group photo of Songzhuang artists after a performance with a small sign supporting Hong Kong.

Photo of Songzhuang artists during an art performance.

Photo of Songzhuang artists during an art performance in support of Hong Kong pro-democracy protests.

 

Petitioners detained for holding up signs outside Beijing South Railway Station on October 2; police arrested one and released the other:

  • Ms. Ran Chongbi (冉崇碧), petitioner from Guangdong Province, taken to the Zhujiafen Police Station in Fengtai District on October 2 with Wang Fang. Later formally arrested. Held at the Fengtai District Detention Center on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Released on bail on June 6, 2015. Reportedly tortured in detention, including having her hands cuffed and legs shackled for more than three months. Not allowed access to legal counsel during entire time in custody.
  • Ms. Wang Fang (王芳), petitioner from Hubei Province, taken to the Zhujiafen Police Station in Fengtai District on October 2. Believed to have been released.

 

Two activists criminally detained at Peking University campus:

  • Ms. Ling Lisha (凌丽莎), arts editor, taken away on October 2 after she posted sign in support of Hong Kong on the campus of Peking University with Zhang Qibin. Criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Ling also worked at the Transition Institute, which was targeted during the crackdown. Held at Haidian District Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on December 11.
  • Mr. Zhang Qibin (张启斌), employee at unnamed foundation, taken away on October 2 after he posted signs in support of Hong Kong on the campus of Peking University with Ling Lisha. Criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” and held at Haidian District Detention Center. Believed to have been released.

 

Police detained staff from the Transition Institute, an independent research center, and one of their lawyers, who remains in custody:

Arrested and released on bail:

  • Mr. Guo Yushan (郭玉闪), scholar, democracy activist, and director of the Transition Institute, arrested on January 3 on a “illegal business activity” charge. First taken into custody and criminally detained on October 9 for “creating a disturbance.” Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on September 15, 2015.
  • Mr. He Zhengjun (何正军), administrative director of Transition Institute, criminally detained on suspicion of “illegal business activity” on November 26. He Zhengjun’s lawyer met with him on January 7, and was told that He’s arrest had already been approved by procuratorate. Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on September 15, 2015.

Released:

  • Mr. Huang Kaiping (黄凯平), manager of the Transition Institute, taken away by police from the institute’s offices on October 9. Held on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” at an unknown location until release on January 28, 2015.

 

Several intellectuals in Beijing were detained and later released:

  • Ms. Kou Yanding (寇延丁), writer, criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on October 9. Held incommunicado until release on February 14, 2015.
  • Mr. Chen Kun (陈堃), Liren College professor focusing on democracy, taken into custody on October 5 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on December 26.
  • Mr. Xue Ye (薛野), poetry editor from Peking University, taken into custody on October 9. Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center before his release on October 12. Taken into custody again on November 26 and held until release on December 26.

 

Three individuals were detained  for 41 days for holding up signs on October 10, the anniverary of the Wuchang Uprising:

  • Mr. Yang Qiuyu (杨秋雨), detained October 10 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Xicheng District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 19.
  • Ms. Wang Yuqin (王玉琴), detained on October 10 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Xicheng District Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 19.
  • Mr. Ye Guoqiang (叶国强), detained on October 10 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Xicheng District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 19.

 

Four individuals were detained for 39 days for holding up signs in support of the Hong Kong protests on October 25:

  • Mr. Ma Xinli (马新立), detained on October 26 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Chaoyang District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on December 3.
  • Mr. Chen Zhaozhi (陈兆志), detained on October 26 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Chaoyang District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on December 3.
  • Mr. Jia Xiping (贾西平), detained on October 26 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Chaoyang District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on December 3.
  • Mr. Quan Jianhu (泉建虎), detained on October 26 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Chaoyang District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on December 3.

 

The following individuals have been formally arrested and released on bail:

  • Ms. Zhang Weishan (张伟姗 aka Zhang Ying 张瑛), petitioner from Hunan province, formally arrested on a charge of “creating a disturbance.” Disappeared on October 9 after holding up a sign in support of the Hong Kong protests at Tiananmen Square. Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until her release on bail in May 2015.

 

The following individuals were detained before being released:

  • Mr. Pei Fugui (裴富贵), activist, taken from home on October 1. Police searched Pei’s house the next day, taking away a desktop computer and two hard drives. Police refused to inform the family of his status until October 10, when they verbally confirmed that he was criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” His detention is related to an October 1 gathering of activists outside Pei’s home in support of Hong Kong. Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 1.
  • Ms. Zheng Luying (郑禄英), detained on October 2 and held on unknown charges in an unknown location. Later released.
  • Ms. Zhang Xiuhua (张秀华), seized on October 7 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Xicheng District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation.”
  • Ms. Li Lirong (李立荣), seized on October 7 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Xicheng District Detention Center until her release.
  • Ms. Wang Jinling (王金玲), petitioner from Heilongjiang Province, criminally detained on October 19 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Initially taken into custody on October 9 after holding up a banner in Beijing’s financial district that said “Hong Kong: We Are With You.” Held at Chaoyang District Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 13.
  • Mr. Li Xuehui (李学惠), detained on October 14 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Shijingshan Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 20.
  • Mr. Zhai Yanmin (翟岩民), detained on October 16 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 25.
  • Mr. Zhang Chao (张超), detained on October 30 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 28.
  • Mr. Hu Junxiong (胡俊雄), detained on November 1 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Fengtai District Detention Center until his release in early December.
  • Ms. Zhou Li (周莉), detained on October 18 on suspicion of “extortion.” Held at Xicheng District Detention Center until her release.
  • Mr. Xu Dong (许东), IT specialist, criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on November 4 after sending a Twitter message supporting Hong Kong. Xu helped develop a software to climb over the Great Firewall, which likely contributed to his detention. Held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until release on January 30.
  • Ms. Shen Lixiu (沈丽秀), criminally detained on November 12 on unknown charges. Held at Dongcheng District Detention Center until release on unknown day.

 

Chongqing Municipality:

Police-have-detained-activists-for-appearing-in-photos-such-as-this-one-in-which-the-banners-read-“Support-Hong-Kong”-and-“Embrace-Freedom-Through-the-Storm.”

  • Ms. Luo Yaling (罗亚玲), activist, held in criminal detention from October 11-30 after she was released at the end of 10-day administrative detention. First taken away on September 30 after she expressed support online for the protests in Hong Kong and uploaded photos of herself and Xie Dan supporting the Hong Kong protests (pictured above, far left). National security officers initially kept Luo under soft detention at her home, and later she was taken to Daxin Village Police Station and then the Chongqing No. 1 Detention & Drug Rehabilitation Center. Released from unknown criminal detention facility to a hospital.
  • Mr. Xie Dan (谢丹), activist, given 10-day administrative detention penalty for uploading photos of with Luo Yaling showing support for the Hong Kong protests (pictured above, far right). Held at Chongqing No. 1 Detention & Drug Rehabilitation Center before being released on October 11. Police initially questioned him on September 30.

 

Shanghai Municipality:

  • Ms. Chen Jianfang (陈建芳), activist petitioner, detained on September 30, likely due to her call for activists to join a demonstration on October 1 in the Shanghai People’s Park in support of the Hong Kong demonstrators. Later released.
  • 刘士辉Mr. Liu Shihui (刘士辉), lawyer, went to Chen Jianfang (陈建芳)’s home along with Jiangsu activist Mr. Le Senping on September 30 to try to stop police from detaining Chen. Briefly taken into custody with Le (below) and later released.

 

 

 

  • Ms. Le Senping (乐森萍), activist from Jiangsu, went to Chen Jianfang (陈建芳)’s home along with Mr. Liu Shihui on September 30 to try to stop police from detaining Chen. Briefly taken into custody with Liu (above) and later released.
  • QQ图片20140930140316Ms. Shen Yanqiu (沈艳秋), activist, plainclothes police took her away on September 30. Shen shaved her head on September 28 and posted a photo of herself online to show solidarity with Hong Kong protestors. Held in an unknown location until her release on an unknown date.

 

 

 

Anhui Province:

Anhui police criminally summoned two activists on October 5 for questioning on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” for supporting the Hong Kong protestors. Both were held at the Baohe Public Security Sub-Bureau in Anhui Province before being released early the next day, after about six hours of interrogation.

  • Mr. Shen Liangqing (沈良庆), activist, his desktop computer and camera memory card were seized during a police search on October 5.
  • Mr. Yin Chun (伊春), activist, his desktop computer and tablet were seized during a police search on October 5.

 

Guangdong Province:

Foshan City

  • Mr. Jia Pin (贾榀), activist with “Southern Street Movement,” taken into custody on October 9. Later criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Likely detained because he had planned to travel to Nanjing to join a demonstration. Held in Nanhai District Detention Center until his release on November 7.

 

On October 14, police took into custody four individuals believed to have travelled to Hong Kong on September 30. Three were later released and one, Chen Qitang, was formally arrested.

  • Ms. Ye Liumei (叶六妹), activist, seized in the morning of October 14 and later criminally detained. Police searched her home. Held at Tongji Police Station of the Chancheng Sub-Bureau of the Foshan City Public Security Bureau until her release.
  • Mr. Liang Zhuosen (梁灼森), activist, seized in the morning of October 14 and later criminally detained. Held at Tongji Police Station of the Chancheng Sub-Bureau of the Foshan City Public Security Bureau until his release.
  • Ms. Guo Huizhen (郭惠珍), activist, seized in the morning of October 14 and later criminally detained. Held at Tongji Police Station of the Chancheng Sub-Bureau of the Foshan City Public Security Bureau until her release.

 

Guangzhou

Guangzhou police seized dozens of activists and citizens who gathered in the Martyr Memorial Gardens to show support for the Hong Kong protestors on September 30. While reportedly up to 20 citizens were seized and taken to unknown locations, CHRD confirmed the detentions of two individuals.

  • Huang Minpeng (黄敏鹏), activist, taken to Datang Police Station in Yuexiu District with Liu Hui, where they were denied food before being released in the afternoon.
  • Liu Hui (刘辉) taken to Datang Police Station in Yuexiu District with Huang Minpeng, where they were denied food before being released in the afternoon.

 

QQ图片20141004001656

On October 3, plainclothes police officers took three men into custody from a residence in Xintang County in Guangzhou. They were criminally detained for holding up a banner in a Guangzhou park that called for freedom and support for the Hong Kong protesters. All three are activists with the “Southern Street Movement” group and had been held at Yuexiu District Detention Center. Two were tried, and one was released.

  • Sun Liyong (孙立勇), activist, released on November 3 after 30 days in custody.

 

 The following individual was criminally detained and then released:

  • Mr. Sun Tao (孙涛), activist with “Southern Street Movement,” taken into police custody on October 23 from home in Fujian Province by police from Fujian and Guangdong Province and criminally detained in Guangzhou. Held at Yuexiu District Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 20.

 

Shenzhen

 

  • Wang LongMr. Wang Long (汪龙), freelance journalist, formally arrested on November 4. Procuratorate did not indict Wang and he was released on April 20, 2015. Wang was criminally detained on the charge of “creating a disturbance” on September 29 after he posted messages online about the Hong Kong protests. Held at Longgang District Detention Center.

 

 

  • Ms. Liu Shasha (刘沙沙), activist, detained on October 24 by Shenzhen border guards as she tried to travel to Hong Kong. Held at unknown location until her release.
  • Mr. Wang Yingguo (王应国), activist, criminally detained on November 3 on suspicion of unknown charges. Home searched and a computer seized. Held at Qingshuihe Police Station in Luohu District until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on December 10.

 

Hunan Province:

Yueyang City

  • Liu DonghuiMr. Liu Donghui (刘东辉), activist, Yueyang City police criminally detained him on October 12 on a charge of “creating a disturbance.” His detention is reportedly related to a trip to Hong Kong to support the protests. Held at Yunxi District Detention Center until release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 12.

 

 

Hengyang City

  • Luo Qun (罗群), resident of Changning County, Hengyang City, criminally detained on suspicion of “fraud” after attempting to travel to Hong Kong to support the protests on October 12. Released on November 6 after signing a guarantee not to go to Hong Kong. Under police surveillance at home.

 

Changsha City

  • Mr. Xie Changzhen (谢长桢), younger brother of Democratic Party member Xie Changfa (谢长发), was given a 10-day administrative detention on October 29 for holding up a banner in support of Occupy Central on the Yuelu Mountain in Changsha. Held at Changsha City Detention Center until his release on November 7.

 

Jiangxi Province:

Jiangxi Province police seized three men on September 30 after they posted photos of themselves holding up signs in support of the Hong Kong protests. It was not known where they were being held.

  • Song ningshengSong Ningsheng (宋宁生), activist, his home was searched. Believed to have been released.

 

 

 

 

  • Mr. Gong Xinhua (龚新华), activist, believed to have been released.
  • Mr. Chen Maosen (陈茂森), activist, released on “bail pending further investigation” on November 19.

 

Xinyu City

  • Ms. Liu Xizhen (刘喜珍), activist, went missing on October 3 after being forcibly returned from Beijing by a member of her work unit from the Xinyu City Steelworks. Illegally held by her work unit until October 23, when Xinyu police criminally detained on her suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Held at Xinyu City Detention Center until her release on “bail pending further investigation” on November 21.

 

Liaoning Province

  • Mr. Lin Mingjie (林明杰), detained on October 27 on unknown charges. Held at Shenyang City No. 1 Detention Center until his release into residential surveillance on November 20.

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